The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to create the global future of open

The OSI listserv

The OSI listserv is at the center of OSI communications. Thousands of emails are exchanged by participants every year on a wide array of topics. This conversation is open for public viewing at https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/osi2016-25. The RSS feed is at https://groups.google.com/forum/feed/osi2016-25/msgs/rss.xml?

OSI listserv

RSS OSI Listserv

  • RE: UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Yeah---there’s a lot of that in the next 10 pages too 😊. The final draft is a little cleaner but that fact is amazing---done by translators who were working seven hour shifts over four days trying to simultaneously edit English and French versions on the fly, often writing based on a translatio
  • Re: UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Thank you, Glen. (The first two pages make me wish I was teaching writing. Two+ pages of paragraphs led by gerunds!) On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 3:15 PM Glenn Hampson wrote: > Not yet---I’ll circulate the cleaned up copy as soon as it’s available. > The general
  • RE: UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Not yet---I’ll circulate the cleaned up copy as soon as it’s available. The general emphasis is much like the attached version that this assembly was editing (starting from page 8 of the pdf). More detail was added and words were changed, but the structure and points are generally the same as in
  • Re: UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Is the text available on the web? On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 2:09 PM Abel L. Packer wrote: > Gkenn > > I fully agree with you that the UNESCO draft recommendation on Open > Science is important (I would say very important) and an (extraordinary > collective highly democratic)
  • Re: UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Gkenn I fully agree with you that the UNESCO draft recommendation on Open Science is important (I would say very important) and an (extraordinary collective highly democratic) effort to be applauded (as it contributes to advance science and scientific knowledge as a global public good). As an
  • UNESCO passes new open science "soft law" May 11, 2021
    Hi Folks, UNESCO has just approved its draft policy for open science. This policy will be voted on by the full UN General Assembly in October. While there is a lot to dislike in this policy---unnecessary specificity, factual errors, ideological distractions, etc.---it is also important to,
  • RE: [External] Re: to read or not to read May 10, 2021
    Agreed Joyce. What I’m reminded of this morning is an example not mentioned in this paper: epistemic trespassing at the policy level. I’ve been “observing” UNESCO’s open science policy deliberations for three days now---two more to go---and the amount of trespassing going on here is, well,
  • RE: [External] Re: to read or not to read May 10, 2021
    If you read the article the author doesn’t cite much if any of the history of science literature that might dispute his thesis. He uses Linus Pauling as an example of a poacher, but cites only one source to support this assertion that someone brought to his attention, which means he doesn’t know
  • FW: Issue 33 S2O May 10, 2021
    Hot off the press from C&E From: Clarke & Esposito Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 2:45 AM To: gham...@nationalscience.org Subject: Issue 33 S2O [image: Clarke & Esposito Logo] [image: The Brief Logo] April, 2021 • Issue #33 • S2O Join the conversati
  • Re: to read or not to read May 9, 2021
    If you want to read it try https://www.academia.edu/34743123/Epistemic_Trespassing However, if you are arguing that these authors are not qualified to write a book on the science of science I would like to hear your argument. David On May 8, 2021, at 11:14 PM, Glenn Hampson
  • RE: to read or not to read May 9, 2021
    Aha! It’s paywalled article but the abstract reads “Epistemic trespassers judge matters outside their field of expertise. Trespassing is ubiquitous in this age of interdisciplinary research and recognizing this will require us to be more intellectually modest.” From: Elizabeth Gadd
  • Re: to read or not to read May 8, 2021
    Epistemic trespassing. https://academic.oup.com/mind/article/128/510/367/4850765 Dr Elizabeth Gadd FHEA Research Policy Manager (Publications) Research and Enterprise Office Loughborough University Loughborough, UK, LE11 3TU Chair: INORMS Research Evaluation Working Group Chair: Lis-Bibli
  • Re: to read or not to read May 8, 2021
    Kuhn et al is a good place to start. I was in that revolution in Phil Sci, as a grad student. Our slogan was "science is as science does", in contrast to the prior school which wanted to say how science should be (Popper for example). So Sci Sci is at least 80 years old. […]
  • Re: to read or not to read May 8, 2021
    Having now read the opening chapter - which points back to Thomas Kuhn as one of the science of science scholars - I see less a tone of "we invented something" ... instead seems to say "we are applying this thing that others have also been doing to some particular use cases." Granted, only
  • RE: to read or not to read May 7, 2021
    Interesting point Lisa. Hopefully not to sound too grumpy here, but I’ve never considered Sci of Sci a settled field anyway, so yes, maybe you’re right. Their approach, though, IMHO, has been the opposing of Zoom bombing. Rather than saying “I’m an expert in field x and I’m going to use my