The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to create the global future of open

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open
Last week, ScieELO celebrated its 20th anniversary by hosting more than 600 leaders from across scholarly communication (including 10 from OSI) to discuss the current state of SciELO and the future of scholarly communication. Many consider SciELO to be the world’s most successful example of a decentralized, researcher-led journal platform. What was learned?
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Last week, the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) was held in Vienna. Much was covered over the two and a half days. A decade in, this conference considered the state of the open access (OA) movement, discussed different approaches to OA, considered inequity and the infrastructure required to meet this need and...
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milky-way
How do we get to a future where open science is the norm? The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine recently commissioned a study to look at this question and develop recommendations. This report does a good job describing the intricacy, complexity, and overlap of open science issues and concerns, and is a...
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rainbow coffee mug
Most librarians are familiar with the definitions of open access created in the early 2000’s (and refined several times since) and are passionate about advancing the cause of open. Most researchers, however, are not, and “open” is a relatively low priority for them. Indeed, the growth of “open access” strictly defined has been slow—approaching only...
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Abstract Repositories are a vital tool in modern information management and a key component of preser­vation and long-term availability. They are not well-suited, however, to the current chal­lenges posed by our information-rich society and the multitude of stakeholders involved in the modern scholarly publishing system. Strengthening repositories and standardizing preserva­tion processes are critically important. This...
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OSI2016 Workgroup Question Are the scholarly publishing tools we’re using today still the right ones? Is the monograph still the best format in the humanities? Is the journal article still best in STM? These products can be difficult to produce and edit, nearly impenetrable to read, and—as in the case of clini­cal research information—they aren’t...
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Abstract The duality of information overload and underload is a defining issue of our age. Scholarly information is abundant but not universally accessible to all scholars and learners, thereby hindering or prohibiting equitable engagement in ongoing scholarly conversations. Access is a core aspect of the issue of overload and underload—both access to research materials and...
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OSI2016 Workgroup Question Do researchers and scientists participate in the current system of scholarly publishing because they like it, they need it, they don’t have a choice in the matter, or they don’t really care one way or another? What perceptions, considerations and incentives do academicians have for staying the course (like impact factors and...
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Abstract / OSI2016 Workgroup Question The At-Large workgroup was the largest and most diverse in terms of stakeholder representa­tion. At-large delegates observed workgroup conversations during the meeting and contributed to these conversations while letting the workgroup teams answer their questions. At-large delegates met during the conference and convened online both before and after the conference...
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Abstract A small, self-selected workgroup was convened to consider issues surrounding impact fac­tors at the first meeting of the Open Scholarship Initiative in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, in April 2016, and focused on the uses and misuses of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF), with a partic­ular focus on research assessment. The workgroup’s report notes that the...
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