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The OSI listserv is at the center of OSI communications. Thousands of emails are exchanged by participants every year on a wide array of topics. This conversation is open for public viewing at https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/osi2016-25. 

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  • RE: infographics redux January 24, 2021
    Let’s take this off-list if you’re interested in discussing more---just remove OSI from the cc. Thanks much, Glenn From: David Wojick Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 4:34 PM To: Glenn Hampson Cc: Margaret Winker Cook
  • RE: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    It’s just one survey among a great many David---just Google “science education” and you’ll get some sense of extensively programmed and analyzed this topic is. We aren’t talking about 1958 high school biology here 😊. And these metrics do indeed bear directly on literacy. The question is what
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    I think you are completely wrong, Glenn. For example, if "adequate background" means something other than what is actually taught then it is a nonsensical concept. You cannot expect people to know what they have not been taught. The very idea that everyone should have a high degree of science
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    It sounds like the test is completely unrealistic. It would be interesting to compare it to what is actually taught. Then too there is age. I had my last biology course in 1958. So I would say this test has no bearing on the question of how much science is taught, which we were discussing. […]
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    It is my experience of American graduates that your education leads to a more well-rounded understanding. As a graduate student I found that my humanities colleagues from the US knew more science than I did - in those days I was an ecclesiastical historian. Since then I am married to a scientist
  • RE: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    David, I’m afraid Maggie is right, emphatically so. There aren’t enough qualified STEM teachers in the US K-12 systems, most high school students graduate without an adequate background in math and science, and education quality varies widely by state (see here, for example, for an essay on
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Per this 2019 Pew Research US survey “About four-in-ten Americans (39%) get between nine and 11 correct answers, classified as having high science knowledge on the 11-item scale or index. Roughly one-third (32%) are classified as having medium science knowledge (five to eight correct answers)
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Maggie, As the article says, the Darwin issue is a long standing one. Even there the curricular issue is mostly just about the degree of certainty to be expressed. Origin of species via natural selection is still universally taught as a concept. But evolution is just a tiny part of the K-12
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    David, Maybe in your region lots of science was taught, but across the US (for example—this isn’t just about the US), curriculum is state by state — take evolution, for example https://www.pewforum.org/2009/02/04/fighting-over-darwin-state-by-state/ And plenty of people didn’t have much science
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Anyone graduating from US public school has had a lot of science, including a lot on the nature of science. You can look at the state K-12 standards to see what is taught in each grade. In the new Next Generation Science Standards there is even more emphasis on the nature of science, too much […]
  • RE: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    I love Sense about Science Anthony---thanks for highlighting their great work. In the world of science communication, there are also groups like COMPASS who wield good influence; and not to toot our own horn here, but SCI has also paneled and keynoted a number of important scicomm conversations
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Hi Margaret I think this is a different role involved. In the UK this is filled (to some extent by this organisation Sense about Science: https://senseaboutscience.org). Is not OSI concerned with bringing about open scholarship by influencing the immediate stakeholders involved in scholarly
  • RE: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Love it. Hey---if you or any OSIers want to sketch these out, please go for it. Send me text and I’ll pretty it up into an infographic and send the first draft back around for review/revision. All your ideas are great. And to the extent we can revise/repackage/link to existing CC-BY materials
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    Glenn and all, I agree with the comments, but could we consider future infographics oriented for the less educated public? It's been suggested to me by friends active in the community that some basic information, beginning with what is science and what is scientific research, is very much
  • Re: infographics redux January 23, 2021
    These are both beautiful graphics and I would love to see them posted where individuals (researchers, students, pi’s and more) would be invited to post their comments. On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 12:59 PM Glenn Hampson wrote: > Thanks Rob---really great ideas. I’ll see

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