The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to create the global future of open

By

OSI
Abstract The scholarly community’s current definition of “open” captures only some of the attributes of openness that exist across different publishing models and content types. Open is not an end in itself, but a means for achieving the most effective dissemination of scholarship and research. We suggest that the different attributes of open exist along...
Read More
Abstract / OSI2016 Workgroup Question This report summarizes the discussion of the Open Impacts workgroup held at the Open Scholarship Initiative meeting in Fairfax, VA, April 19-22, 2016. The workgroup tackled the following questions at OSI2016: How fast is open access growing? Is this fast enough? Why or why not? What are the impacts of...
Read More
OSI2016 Workgroup Question Are the scholarly publishing tools we’re using today still the right ones? Is the monograph still the best format in the humanities? Is the journal article still best in STM? These products can be difficult to produce and edit, nearly impenetrable to read, and—as in the case of clinical research information—they aren’t...
Read More
Abstract / OSI2016 Workgroup Question What do we mean by publishing in today’s world? What should be the goals of scholarly publishing? What are the ideals to which scholarly publishing should aspire? What roles might scholarly publishers have in the future? What scenarios exist where publishers con­tinue to play a vital role but information moves...
Read More
Abstract The mechanisms used for scholarly publishing have remained largely unchanged over time, even as we’ve moved from a print-based world to a digital world. The scholarly communication ecosystem, however, is now undergoing a period of rapid transformation, including the introduction of new actors, new services, and increased pressure to improve the means of scholarly...
Read More
The Scholarly Kitchen chefs recently took time to reflect on OSI2016. What were their overall perceptions? What was accomplished? Who or what was missing? Writes Alison Mudditt, “We, like pretty much all of the delegates, approached this meeting with some degree of trepidation and uncertainly about goals and process, but ended up pleasantly surprised. As...
Read More
There are more than 34,000 scientific, medical and technical peer-reviewed scholarly journals in the world. They publish nearly 2.5 million articles a year — about an article every 13 seconds. In a field of more than seven million researchers, how is anyone supposed to stay up-to-date? And for publishers, how do they know which manuscripts will capture readers’...
Read More
What if more is bad? In 1963, the physicist and historian of science Derek de Solla Price looked at growth trends in the research enterprise and saw the threat of“scientific doomsday”. The number of scientists and publications had been growing exponentially for 250 years, and Price realized that the trend was unsustainable. Within a couple...
Read More
It was always an ambitious project – trying to gather 250 high level delegates from all aspects of the scholarly communication process with the goal of better communication and idea sharing between sectors of the ecosystem. The first meeting of the Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) happened in Fairfax, Virginia last week. Kudos to the National Science Communication...
Read More
PLOS is developing a new submission system to enhance the publishing experience for our community of editors, authors and reviewers. Why are we doing this? The linear, step-by-step process of creating, submitting and reviewing a manuscript simply does not satisfy the needs of scientists today. Large-scale solutions to the current challenges of scientific publishing are...
Read More
1 6 7 8 9 10 11