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  • an hour of new reading :) October 15, 2019
    Hi Folks, I’m combining the latest good reads into a single email (in case you haven’t seen these announcements): - From Steve Fiore, The Open Tide – How openness in research and communication is becoming the default setting. Open Access to research findings is often presented as
  • Re: Bundling October 15, 2019
    It strikes me that the big publishers have taken big steps to meet criticism, which have not been appreciated. The big deal greatly reduced the price per journal and hybridization made all articles potentially OA, at the author's choice. Neither was good enough. David On Oct 14, 2019, at 5:36
  • Re: Bundling October 14, 2019
    Um, no. The pricing of many large packages are historical. They are based on historical spending. If a publisher had a $50,000 contract with a library for 500 journals prior to a "big deal" being introduced, the Big Deal might add 1,000 journals for an additional charge of 15%, or $7,500.
  • RE: University Press Library October 14, 2019
    Thank you Manfredi---very helpful article. I wonder if this data has been updated somewhere? Joe---I’m sure you’re correct about avoiding the temptation to oversimplify this. Still, I think it’s important to look for patterns, lessons and insights from other markets---books, music, healthcare
  • RE: Bundling October 14, 2019
    Hello there. I am new to this list and hence very hesitant to suggest a reference to such a well informed set of people. As an economist I am obviously biased in favour of a colleague of the stature of Ted Bergstrom, but I think that his piece in the PNAS (Bergstrom et al. “Evaluating […]
  • Re: University Press Library October 14, 2019
    It's infinitely more complicated than this. First, books are MUCH bigger as an industry than journals, probably 9 times larger, depending on whose stats you use. Second, there are books on every topic (not to mention fiction), whereas journals are narrowly focused on academic topics. Third,
  • RE: University Press Library October 14, 2019
    Thanks Mel---this is all very interesting. Is there a guide somewhere we can reference for more info?---some white paper, report, study, etc. that shows all scholcomm expenditure data across all publishers and libraries (the devil is in the details, of course, but it would be interesting to know
  • RE: University Press Library October 14, 2019
    Couple things. Re: your speculation below about 90% of the titles we still need coming from the big six, it’s not anywhere close to that high. And the numbers vary hugely depending on whether you’re talking about the number of titles or the number of dollars. I run an engineering library
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    Among many others—journals all over the South. Margaret On Oct 12, 2019, at 10:39 AM, Glenn Hampson wrote: Are you referring here to SciELO? Sent from my iPhone On Oct 12, 2019, at 8:22 AM, Margaret Winker Cook wrote: All true, but when
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    Are you referring here to SciELO? Sent from my iPhone On Oct 12, 2019, at 8:22 AM, Margaret Winker Cook wrote: All true, but when discussing gold OA options without APCs, it’s worthwhile considering the South’s solutions. Margaret On Oct 12, 2019, at 10:04 AM, Rick
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    All true, but when discussing gold OA options without APCs, it’s worthwhile considering the South’s solutions. Margaret On Oct 12, 2019, at 10:04 AM, Rick Anderson wrote: But let’s also remember that DOAJ doesn’t count all of the journals that charge APCs for OA publication
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    "It pays the bills." Does it? Or, at least does it always? For hybrid, clearly yes. But, for pure OA journals, is this proving true? I'm hearing an undercurrent that maybe that isn't the case .... I do of course know the studies that conclude "there is enough money in the system" ... but I
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    But let’s also remember that DOAJ doesn’t count all of the journals that charge APCs for OA publication: https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2015/08/26/do-most-oa-journals-not-charge-an-apc-sort-of-it-depends/ As David Crotty points out in this piece, a more accurate representation of
  • Re: Study projects future of article OA October 12, 2019
    Let’s not forget that most (71% as of last year) journals indexed in DOAJ do not charge APCs. https://sustainingknowledgecommons.org/2018/02/06/doaj-apc-information-as-of-jan-31-2018/9/ Particularly in the South, APCs are not the solution—journals are funded by institutions, governments, or
  • Re: University Press Library October 12, 2019
    It's important to point out that aggregators complement as well as compete with primary publishers - if a publisher chooses to make its content available through EBSCO or ProQuest, it has to decide whether they can make more revenues from the licensing deals than if it were to try and sell the