The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to improve the future of open

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open access
How many of the world’s research articles can be read for free by anyone anywhere? This “opening” of the scholarly record is a herculean task of global importance for research and society, being championed by groups around the world from universities to libraries, governments, research funders and publishers. So, how much progress have we made,...
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‘Plan S’ sets out ten principles, many of which have been foreshadowed in previous policy documents and developments. Nevertheless, when taken together they represent a bold statement of intent from this group of European funders. Of particular note are the Plan’s requirements that authors retain copyright in their works (while granting most or all copyright...
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Open scholar and journalist Richard Poynder recently published an interview with Robert-Jans Smits, the Open Access Envoy of the European Commission and architect of Plan S. In this interview, Smits sheds some light on exactly how he sees this plan being implemented. This interview is reprinted here courtesy of Dr. Poynder, and is available under...
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Last week, the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) was held in Vienna. Much was covered over the two and a half days. A decade in, this conference considered the state of the open access (OA) movement, discussed different approaches to OA, considered inequity and the infrastructure required to meet this need and...
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 OSI is an effort of convergence; one way to facilitate conversations that can only happen at crossroads that weave through and bind the scholarly communication community together.  It is also an acknowledgement of many differing views and approaches, even when there are shared values. Rick Anderson, Associate Dean for Collections and Scholarly Communication at the University...
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To use Google Groups Discussions, please enable JavaScript in your browser settings, and then refresh this page. In January, a commonly referenced resource for combatting “predatory publishing”, Beall’s List, was removed by creator, Jeffrey Beall.  Predatory publishing most often refers to ostensibly open access journals that charge scholars for article processing (APCs) without providing services...
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This report, which has been submitted for publication to UNESCO, presents a practical framework for understanding the real world benefits of open access publishing. Jean-Gabriel Bankier and Promita Chatterji group these benefits into three categories: benefits for authors, for readers, and for institutions. Within this framework they present 100 particular accounts of benefits of open...
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Many studies show that open access (OA) articles—articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees—are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence...
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Part 5: A perspective on Open Access in Germany I am very pleased to introduce the fifth article in this series of snapshots of the progress towards open access around the globe. Authors Norbert Lossau, Birgit Schmidt and Margo Bargheer from the University of Goettingen have written a definitive summary of progress towards open access...
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The “evolving open” topic covers a lot of ground, much of which has been already discussed in previous tutorials. The following items are intended to fill in some of the gaps that haven’t been covered yet, particularly in science and medical research but also with regard to some of the initiatives being undertaken by your...
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