The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to create the global future of open

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OSI Reports
Abstract / OSI2017 Workgroup Question Following up on recommendations from OSI 2016, this team will dig deeper into the question of developing and recommending new tools to repair or replace the journal impact factor (and/or how it is used), and propose actions the OSI community can take between now and the next meeting. What’s needed?...
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Abstract / OSI2017 Workgroup Question The HSS Scholars and Scientists workgroup was convened in recognition of the diverse dynamics and requirements of different research communities, particularly within the Humanities and the Social Sciences (HSS). Within these disciplines there are significant differences in research culture, practices, and access to funding, highlighting that a different approach may...
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Abstract / OSI2017 Workgroup Question In their report, delegates of the Who Decides? workgroup of the OSI2016 conference put forth three proposals in which key stakeholders might convene to enact an economically viable and sustainable transformation of the current scholarly communications system to one of open access. The “Global Flip” workgroup of OSI2017 discussed the...
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Abstract / OSI2017 Workgroup Question Following up on a proposal from OSI2016, this workgroup will identify and/or design new funding models for open scholarship, such as a venture fund that can allow more support for joint efforts, or propose ways to improve existing funding by improving the flexibility of library budgets (e.g. by examining the...
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Abstract / OSI2017 Workgroup Question Following a common thread from throughout OSI2016, this workgroup will develop partnership proposals for this community to work together to improve the culture of communication inside academia, particularly inside research. As part of this effort, it may be important to clarify messaging surrounding the benefits and impacts of open access...
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Sticky Post
Scholarly publishing has been in a state of transition for several decades now, driven by the rapid evolution and expectations of our digital society, the explosion and specialization of research over this period of time, and importantly, a concerted effort—led in large part by the open access movement—to make more of the world’s research information...
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Abstract Repositories are a vital tool in modern information management and a key component of preser­vation and long-term availability. They are not well-suited, however, to the current chal­lenges posed by our information-rich society and the multitude of stakeholders involved in the modern scholarly publishing system. Strengthening repositories and standardizing preserva­tion processes are critically important. This...
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OSI2016 Workgroup Question Are the scholarly publishing tools we’re using today still the right ones? Is the monograph still the best format in the humanities? Is the journal article still best in STM? These products can be difficult to produce and edit, nearly impenetrable to read, and—as in the case of clini­cal research information—they aren’t...
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Abstract The duality of information overload and underload is a defining issue of our age. Scholarly information is abundant but not universally accessible to all scholars and learners, thereby hindering or prohibiting equitable engagement in ongoing scholarly conversations. Access is a core aspect of the issue of overload and underload—both access to research materials and...
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OSI2016 Workgroup Question Do researchers and scientists participate in the current system of scholarly publishing because they like it, they need it, they don’t have a choice in the matter, or they don’t really care one way or another? What perceptions, considerations and incentives do academicians have for staying the course (like impact factors and...
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