The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to improve the future of open

Category

Community
During August the Research Councils UK on behalf of the UK Open Research Data Forum released a draft Concordat on Open Research Data for which they have sought feedback. The Universities of Bristol, Cambridge, Manchester, Nottingham and Oxford prepared a joint response which was sent to the RCUK on 28 September 2015. The response is reproduced...
Read More
Éric Archambault, Grégoire Côté, Brooke Struck and Matthieu Voorons Science-Metrix and 1science, 1335 Mont-Royal E., Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H2J 1Y6 This note presents data from the 1science oaIndx on the average of relative citations (ARC) for 3.3 million papers published from 2007 to 2009 and indexed in the Web of Science (WoS). These data show...
Read More
The Federal Trade Commission has charged the publisher of hundreds of purported online academic journals with deceiving academics and researchers about the nature of its publications and hiding publication fees ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars. The FTC’s complaint alleges that OMICS Group, Inc., along with two affiliated companies and their president and director,...
Read More
Over the last decade, there have been significant changes in data sharing policies and in the data sharing environment faced by life science researchers. Using data from a 2013 survey of over 1600 life science researchers, we analyze the effects of sharing policies of funding agencies and journals. We also examine the effects of new...
Read More
According to a report at STM-Publishing.com, The open access journal, BMC Psychology, has announced it will launch the first ever randomized controlled trial to find out if a ‘results free’ peer-review process can help reduce publication bias. ‘Results free’ means that reviewers of research manuscripts submitted for publication will not be able to see the...
Read More
Many studies show that open access (OA) articles—articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees—are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence...
Read More
Knowing the impact of your research is important, particularly for career advancement, funding applications, and demonstrating the reach and significance of your work. Because impact can be measured in many ways, we take a holistic approach at Elsevier, analyzing metrics at the journal, researcher and article levels so researchers can be recognized for multiple forms...
Read More
Being asked to be a “Vision Speaker” leaves me only slightly less queasy than being called a “thought-leader” (what an awful phrase that is!), but there I was in Albuquerque this past June, kicking off the annual NASIG conference.  Fortunately, I was in good company. Heather Joseph, from SPARC, opened up day 2, and James...
Read More
Academics, it’s often said, don’t play well with others. But that cliché doesn’t apply to all of us. Humanists may derive their practices from the myth of the solitary genius laboring in the garret, but the laboratory sciences are justly known for their culture of collaboration. Bench scientists, as they’re also called, are socialized into...
Read More
.entry-header More often than not, on any given day, someone sends me a link to an article detailing 1) why it is academic science needs more funds and 2) all the ways the system rewards the wrong behaviors and 3) why 2 is a result of 1.   Here’s the latest example: http://www.vox.com/2016/7/14/12016710/science-challeges-research-funding-peer-review-process What is missing...
Read More
1 2 3 4