The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to improve the future of open

Category

Community
 OSI is an effort of convergence; one way to facilitate conversations that can only happen at crossroads that weave through and bind the scholarly communication community together.  It is also an acknowledgement of many differing views and approaches, even when there are shared values. Rick Anderson, Associate Dean for Collections and Scholarly Communication at the University...
Read More
To use Google Groups Discussions, please enable JavaScript in your browser settings, and then refresh this page. In January, a commonly referenced resource for combatting “predatory publishing”, Beall’s List, was removed by creator, Jeffrey Beall.  Predatory publishing most often refers to ostensibly open access journals that charge scholars for article processing (APCs) without providing services...
Read More
The research community begins 2017 with questions. Questions directed at our ability to continue supporting research projects, collaborations, and communities due to potential changes and threats to available funding and opportunities. The role of advocacy in scholarship and the role of scholarship in the public is at least being described in the extremes right now, even...
Read More
Danny Kingsley, Head of Scholarly Communication at University of Cambridge recaps an annual academically related, publisher oriented conference held in central London early this year.  The take presents an interesting kaleidoscope of issues, comments and conversations charting various aspects of scholarly publication through a 2-day conference that develops important perspectives beyond the faculty lounge and...
Read More
Scientist and former president of the American Society for Cell Biology,  Professor Ron Vale, tracks strategic efforts to move scholarly publishing forward for cell biologists and readers of the society’s monthly newsletter.  He advocates for the further development of preprints in biology.   Source: On Preprints, and Beer and Tacos – ASCB
Read More
The Association of Research Libraries recently published a white paper by Dr. David Shulenberger assessing the potential impact of a systemwide flip to APCs. Did Shulenberger get it right? Some think not. Source: APCs and Competition: What Shulenberger Got Wrong | The Scholarly Kitchen
Read More
This report, which has been submitted for publication to UNESCO, presents a practical framework for understanding the real world benefits of open access publishing. Jean-Gabriel Bankier and Promita Chatterji group these benefits into three categories: benefits for authors, for readers, and for institutions. Within this framework they present 100 particular accounts of benefits of open...
Read More
In this commentary Adam Briggle and Robert Frodeman, who are both philosophers at the University of North Texas, lament the insularity of graduate study in philosophy. Individuals who earn a doctorate in philosophy are trained exclusively for the academy, despite the fact that well-framed questions are useful in any context. Briggle and Frodeman argue that...
Read More
Science is in big trouble. Or so we’re told. In the past several years, many scientists have become afflicted with a serious case of doubt — doubt in the very institution of science. As reporters covering medicine, psychology, climate change, and other areas of research, we wanted to understand this epidemic of doubt. So we...
Read More
A major goal of the Scholarly Commons program is to determine whether a set of high level principles that define the abstract entity known as the Scholarly Commons can be expressed in a useful way.   This exercise involves synthesis of activities from the Madrid Workshop, Re-imaginging Research Communications, and follow on activities at FORCE2016 and...
Read More
1 2 3 4