The Open Scholarship Initiative
Working together in partnership with UNESCO to improve the future of open

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‘Plan S’ sets out ten principles, many of which have been foreshadowed in previous policy documents and developments. Nevertheless, when taken together they represent a bold statement of intent from this group of European funders. Of particular note are the Plan’s requirements that authors retain copyright in their works (while granting most or all copyright...
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Open scholar and journalist Richard Poynder recently published an interview with Robert-Jans Smits, the Open Access Envoy of the European Commission and architect of Plan S. In this interview, Smits sheds some light on exactly how he sees this plan being implemented. This interview is reprinted here courtesy of Dr. Poynder, and is available under...
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Last week, ScieELO celebrated its 20th anniversary by hosting more than 600 leaders from across scholarly communication (including 10 from OSI) to discuss the current state of SciELO and the future of scholarly communication. Many consider SciELO to be the world’s most successful example of a decentralized, researcher-led journal platform. What was learned?
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Last week, the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) was held in Vienna. Much was covered over the two and a half days. A decade in, this conference considered the state of the open access (OA) movement, discussed different approaches to OA, considered inequity and the infrastructure required to meet this need and...
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OSI is a very diverse group, including over 400 leaders from 24 countries, 250 institutions and 18 scholarly communication stakeholder groups—publishers, universities, researchers, libraries, open science groups and more. As such, we have broad expertise and a wide variety of perspectives on what the future of open science (and more broadly, open scholarship) should look...
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What do the foundation of open scholarship look like at a really granular level? Exactly what is open scholarship, how do we get there in broad terms, and what are the short-term, mid-term, and long-term strategies can we employ to get there? Jon Tenant has just published perhaps the most robust and detailed look at...
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milky-way
How do we get to a future where open science is the norm? The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine recently commissioned a study to look at this question and develop recommendations. This report does a good job describing the intricacy, complexity, and overlap of open science issues and concerns, and is a...
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typewriter
The demise of Beall’s list has left a void in scholarly communications. Contested as his original lists were, they brought focus to an important issue is research. The need for a resource like this still exists---predatory publishers aren’t going away. What should be done? Why? And by whom?
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rainbow coffee mug
Most librarians are familiar with the definitions of open access created in the early 2000’s (and refined several times since) and are passionate about advancing the cause of open. Most researchers, however, are not, and “open” is a relatively low priority for them. Indeed, the growth of “open access” strictly defined has been slow—approaching only...
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One of the most contested and discussed concept in scholarly communication is about to take center stage in a new documentary film.  Jason Schmitt, an Associate Professor of Communication & Media at Clarkson University, will produce and direct “Paywall: The Business of Scholarship.”  One way that he will be capturing the many facets of this debate is...
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